How To Succeed With Twitter

By, Tony Guidry (www.aScratchyThroat.com)

twitter iconMarch 2013

Twitter is an essential tool in your social media strategy. With 250 million unique users monthly, and over 500 million registered users, this is a platform where you definitely need to establish your presence. Today our focus is on the best ways to use twitter to reach people who share your profession or area of interest. In other words, we’ll be focusing on how you can use twitter to interact with people in the music industry, in order to learn from the professionals.

I chose to start by sharing with you ways to interact with ‘decision-makers’ and people who influence the music industry because for most aspiring artists there is a NEED to be educated about the business of music.

You may want to start by following the CEO’s of major record labels & their subsidiaries. You may think that if they hear your music they’ll sign you. Well the music industry doesn’t work that way. (But that’s another article for another time & place). As an aspiring artist, the people who influence and choose what goes on in the music industry – the people that are REALLY important to you – aren’t the CEO’s. You’re going to want to follow the DJ’s and club promoters and venues in your area, and the legitimate publicists, managers, etc who offer the guidance you may need.

You’ll also have to determine if these people actually use twitter regularly or not. LA Reid (@LA_Reid), CEO of Epic Records mostly tweets quotes and doesn’t really interact with other people much on twitter (he doesn’t need to). While a person like Wendy Day  (@RapCoalition), who helps build independent labels and artists’ careers, is on twitter throughout the day, everyday. Wendy interacts with her followers and gives them insight and instruction on how to reach their goals in the music industry. But, if you send her something that looks like this:

twitter spoof

I GUARANTEE that she won’t answer you. This is called ‘spamming your link’ and it is TOTALLY ineffective. Only amateurs consider this marketing or promoting. Spamming your link only gets you blocked, muted or unfollowed.

None of the “quick” fixes work. Buying followers doesn’t work. All the social media platforms give you “instant access to millions” – but establishing yourself on twitter requires you to dedicate some time and effort to what you say, how you say it, who you interact with and when you speak (tweet).

WHAT TO SAY

Say nothing at first. At first you LISTEN. The key to growing your base on twitter is to connect with the the people who have similar interests. You can only find these people by listening, watching, and paying attention to what others are saying FIRST. Engage with these people based on the things you have in common. Talib Kweli (@TalibKweli) recently followed me because of our shared interest in the plight of Leonard Peltier.

When you do start tweeting, say what YOU think and how YOU feel. Once you’ve started using twitter regularly, you should easily learn twitter etiquette and find other  people with similar interests. If you’re an aspiring rapper and you befriend other aspiring rappers and follow each other, you’ll have a million followers in no time!!!

Tweet about your interests and your day to day activities. Twitter is a place where communication (back AND forth) is REQUIRED. If you constantly tweet your video link or ReverbNation URL, it’ll be extra hard to have meaningful interaction with others. Who likes talking to someone that’s always self-centered and talking about themselves? NOBODY.

So, you want to mention the things that actually interest you as a person. It’s as simple as being yourself in your tweets and sharing who you are as a person and artist. Follow the people who interest you and some of them will follow you back. Read the tweets of the people you find interesting, and comment accordingly. As long as you’re consistent, you’ll see the number of your followers begin to build. Even more importantly, you’ll meet people with similar interests and goals from different cities, states & countries – and maybe you can network with them to further BOTH of your goals.

Don’t get caught up on the total number of your followers. Follow the people you can learn from and interact with them. If you follow someone who is well respected in the music industry like @RapCoalition, you’ll see that she tweets a lot of good info on the music business and other issues , don’t tweet AT her about your new single or video. Listen first, read her tweets, learn about her and what she does…then when she tweets about something of interest to you, engage her in a conversation on that topic.

The more you use twitter as a tool to converse with others, the more you’ll learn and improve your ability to really network with people. Your mastery of this ability will place you in a position to meet new people who can really help you move forward with your goals in the music industry.

Social Media is only one piece of the pie in promoting your music. You’ve got to tie in street promotions, performances, press, promotional touring, etc with internet marketing in order to maximize the potential of your music. A Scratchy Throat ensures that you have a powerful & professional online presence.

Tony Guidry is Senior Marketing Manager for A Scratchy Throat. A Scratchy Throat – the brainchild of industry mainstay Wendy Day – provides professional social media marketing specifically designed for today’s aspiring artists.

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By, Wendy Day (www.SlavesNoMore.com music industry how-to site coming soon…) Before you read this article, please make sure you’ve already read this primer: http://bit.ly/100VB2r about the basics of securing radio spins.

Radio is still the most misunderstood aspect of this industry. I see people lose tens of thousands of dollars constantly in this industry because they either trust the wrong radio promoters or they don’t know what they are doing. I can’t teach you whom to trust, but I can tell you how I successfully pursue radio for my artists.

radio-money

I am NOT a radio promoter, I am a consultant. I help people start labels and make money with their music, so one of the many things I do is hire and interact with radio promoters. I have relationships with 10 or 12 different top independent radio promotion people all across the country. I trust them. They have all delivered results for my clients in the recent past. But just because they do a great job for me doesn’t mean they will do a great job for you. [I protect my connections at radio, so if I don’t know you well, I won’t share an introduction with you. Don’t even ask!]

There are MANY variables with radio: time of year, how crowded the radio market is, money, your song, sound, subject matter, money, tempo, features, who’s behind it, the artist, work ethic, money, how established the artist is, how likable the artist is, how likable and knowledgable you are, money, relationships, power, experience, catchiness, money, frequency of your releases, your money, their money, competing labels’ money, etc.

I’m going to assume you’ve done these things before you start spending money at radio:

1. You’ve gotten your single hot on the streets and in the clubs in your region (not just your city, but in the cities that are within a 5 hour driving radius of where you or your artist live) because you’ve already read http://bit.ly/ZvYfJu and maybe even had the chance to read http://bit.ly/YXtwUN as well.

2. You have a radio ready song that’s not only marketable for radio and fits the format, but is mixed and mastered to compete with everything already at radio such as Kanye, Jay Z, 2Chainz, Rihanna, Ke$ha, Lil Wayne, etc. There’s no cursing, the song is around 3 and a half minutes in length, and the subject matter is palatable (even clean versions of songs like “I Wanna F#ck Your B#tch” are harder to work than songs about love and respect, for example, especially for new artists who are scrutinized more harshly).

3. If you have a feature from an established artist on the single, you’ve already gotten the necessary clearances, in writing, from both the artist AND the label to whom he or she is signed giving you “single rights.” If an outside producer (someone not signed to your company) produced the beat, you have a contract with that producer saying you can use his production.

4. You have a good reason for wanting radio play–to sell single downloads, to increase awareness and build show opportunities, etc. By the way, just wanting to hear yourself on the radio, or because you want to be famous are really bad reasons to spend $15k to $100k on radio spins. If you only have one song to work, and no plan, you are wasting everyone’s time and your money.

5. You have registered every version of your single with both MediaBase and BDS. If you don’t know how, your radio promoter can help you do this. You’ve established your ASCAP and/or BMI, and SoundExchange registrations. If you don’t know how to do this, add “.com” to the end of each company and do the research online (such as BMI.com).

Once you’ve accomplished the basics, it’s time to decide which markets are best to break for your artists. The majority of artists that I consult are southern in their sound, so I usually focus on radio in the south initially and then spread into the Midwest. I choose which radio promoter to use based on my target markets.

Each radio promoter has key relationships, and what you are buying IS his or her relationships with program directors in key markets. You also need relationships with multiple radio promoters because when one is overwhelmed with a lot of records to work, you don’t want to hire him or her to work your record. It could easily get lost.

I always focus on a workable area so we can back up our records with contests, give-always, performances, etc–for example, I don’t really want the single spinning simultaneously at radio in San Francisco, Las Vegas, Miami, and Baltimore. They are too spread out for a small label or an indie artist to affordably work them. I prefer to stick to regions: Southeast, or Mid-south, or Midwest. I back up the radio spins by continuing to promote on the streets (promotional tours work wonders) in each area where we get radio play.

I don’t initially go after major markets like Houston, Dallas, Chicago, or Atlanta. I secure the surrounding smaller markets and then build into the larger cities once we have a story to tell about the single–once it has legs. I do NOT have people call in to request the song because I believe real reaction is superior over fake results. I do, however, print thousands of flyers with radio request line phone numbers for each market to inspire fans to request our song. I also use targeted social media to encourage my artist’s fans to support our single.

With rap music, there are 3 radio formats we can target depending on the sound of the song (and subject matter): Urban, Rhythmic, and Top 40 (Pop). Urban is the easiest to get added, Rhythmic a bit more challenging (and more costly), and Pop is the hardest (and most expensive). Think of them as 3 steps, provided your song fits at all three formats; you can start at Urban, grow into Rhythmic stations, and then expand into Pop. Again, IF the sound of your song warrants that–most do not.

I’ve never seen a record climb backwards, meaning I would never go after Pop radio and then try to secure Rhythmic or Urban. Urban, Rhythmic, then Pop. If your song is more mainstream, I’d bypass Urban and go right to Rhythmic and then Pop. In charting single sales, Urban spins rarely turn into single download sales, while Rhythmic and Pop almost always directly correlate to single sales. Urban spins do help build a rapper’s initial popularity at securing shows or being able to increase his or her show price.

Each radio format has a limited number of slots for songs. These slots are filled by hit records and the most well known artists. Remember, the goal of the station is to keep people from changing the station to the competition and most listeners want to hear songs they know so they can sing along. Each week there are usually only one or two slots available yet the Program Directors receive many songs vying for those slots. It’s very competitive at radio and the best songs don’t necessarily survive.

Once you’ve got an idea of your territory and chosen the radio promoter, it’s time to start getting the spins. The radio promoter will give you an add date at radio (always a Tuesday). This date will be chosen based on the timing of what else is dropping in the marketplace, so your record doesn’t get passed over for the superstar records (a risk that is always there) or lost in a sea of other priorities. The reality is that if it’s a choice between your record or a major label record, the radio program director will most likely support the major label because there is a strong relationship there. Major labels have been supporting radio for many years before your one little record, and will for many years after your one little record. Having said that, a hit record has value to everyone and gets attention.

Program Directors (PDs) are the decision makers at radio stations that choose what gets played on the radio. Music Directors (MDs) are the people directly under the PDs who usually suggest music and often meet with artists and labels. They are rarely the decision makers but run interference for the PDs.

Payola is illegal. There is not one radio station in this country that will take money from you to play your record. There is not one radio station that will even make a move that could be interpreted as payola (like accepting a gift, or swapping a performance for increased spins, etc). But you will pay the radio promoter. You police the success of your record via BDS or MediaBase reports that track the amount and time of your spins daily and/or weekly.

If you hire a radio promoter to get you spins on twenty stations, he or she will. Whether those stations benefit you is another story, but you got what you asked for–spins on 20 stations. It’s human nature to go where there’s the least resistance, so those 20 stations might be the easiest ones to deliver, as opposed to the best stations for your project. It’s YOUR project, so it’s your job to know which stations are beneficial and which stations are not. You must know what your needs and goals are and work with the promoters to deliver what you need and what you can best afford. Radio is an expensive game. You also need to work within the realistic confines of what the radio promoter can deliver. It’s not like you make a list and say “I want these stations at this time everyday.” Those would be advertisements.

Radio is a wonderful medium to reach large amounts of people, mostly women, with your music. You focus on one single at a time and the life of a single at radio is 12 to 16 weeks. Make sure your timing is right and make sure you can back up that single with street promotions, Internet promotions, a promo tour, etc while the song still has life in it.

I work my records slowly–meaning I spend slowly at radio. I never give a radio promoter $75,000 and say ‘go get me the south.’ I test my records, usually spending around $10,000 initially to see if my record has legs. This tests a few good markets and I can see if the record stays only in the overnight slots or if it moves into better day parts. I want to see if it’s “reacting.” I can see if the Program Director embraces the record (it increases in spins naturally every week) or not. My plan is that if I’m going to lose money on a single at radio (which is unlikely because it has a strong street and club buzz, so I already know fans like it), I’m going to lose as little as possible.

Much of what I want to teach you, I can’t because it’s based on feeling. You learn to feel records and you can tell when they are reacting or not. You light the spark and then hope it catches fire. Sometimes emotion and our own love of a record can cloud our judgment of whether or not we have a strong single. I’ve seen many people chase a record and spend $50,000 or $75,000 only to learn that the single did not react at radio. I’d rather learn this after $10,000 or $20,000 is spent. The ONLY folks who determine if a song is a hit record are the fans–the listeners. You don’t know, I don’t know, your consultants don’t know, the radio station doesn’t know. Only the fans can determine if it reacts or not by whether they embrace it or not. You can’t really force a hit…I’ve tried.

Lastly, radio is a great way to reach a large amount of people at once, as long as people continue to listen to the radio. Your BDS or MediaBase reports tell you how many thousands or millions of people are potentially hearing your record. If your goal is to get a deal from just radio spins, you haven’t done enough research on how to get a record deal. If you think you can spend $20,000 to get 500 spins a week at urban radio, you haven’t done enough research on how radio works. If you don’t have a goal for your radio play, you’re wasting your time and money, and taking away the few open slots at radio for those of us who have a goal and a plan! Get out of the way.

written by Wendy Day (wendyday.com)

money2Marketing is the overall image and awareness that is put forth by your brand as you advertise, promote, do interviews and basically spread the word about your music (which is your product). One of the keys is to know exactly who will buy your music, and tailor your marketing campaign to them. The best method to draw in fans is “word of mouth,” so therefore your goal should always be to spark positive conversation (word of mouth) about you and your music.

Who Is Your Potential Fan?

Taking it outside of music for a minute, can we all agree that the person who shops at K-Mart is different from the person who shops at Neiman Marcus? The person who drives a Hyundai, may have different interests from the person driving a Bentley? So back to music now—the person who is listening to or buying Justin Bieber’s music is different from the person who supports Trae. Beiber has a younger audience, more pop music, radio, and internet driven, while Trae makes music to ride and/or smoke to—meaning the fan is older and probably more likely to be male. They are also more likely to buy a CD at the local Swap Meet or the Car Wash, while a Bieber fan may be more likely to download his music to an iPod, smartphone, or MP3 player, or buy the CD at the Best Buy next to the Mall for $9.99.

So, if I was marketing a young pop artist, I might try to book him on Nickelodeon shows and set up a high school or Mall tour. With a rapper who doesn’t appeal to a teenage demographic, I’d probably do more of a college tour, and club dates reaching a 21 and older crowd. So, it’s important to know who is buying your music. You need to be able to figure out the demographic for your music or your song, and that will let you know the direction your marketing needs to take. If you are not able to determine who your fan base is yourself, you need to find someone around you who can. But they better be right. If you are making music that appeals to white skateboard twenty-something kids and you market to young inner city teens, you are fucked in the gate!

When I was out on the road with BloodRaw in February of ’08, I kept dragging him to college campuses because he makes anthem type party raps, and he kept telling me’ “Let’s go to the ‘Hood.“ It’s not that one is right and one is wrong, but that he knows who buys and listens to his music. In this case, we blitzed the ‘hoods first and then grew out to the college and party crowds. He had a perfect understanding of who his market is.

How Will You Reach Them?

Once you know who will buy your music, it becomes pretty clear what your image needs to be to reach your market. In Young Jeezy’s case, he’s that dope boy turned rapper who’s about making money, partying in the clubs, buying material items, and driving expensive cars. In Jay Z’s case, he’s that Billionaire Mogul running his own empire and living the life that this brings. Kanye is the intelligent around-the-way guy who dropped out of college to pursue a dream and feels a need to voice his opinion about everything publicly. Lil Kim and Foxy Brown are the old school ‘hood chicks that every guy knows and loves while Nicki Minaj is the new “Barbie” on the block. Odd Future are the zany “I don’t give a fuck” guys who act a fool and hate everything. Wiz Khalifa is your boy who all he wants to do is smoke weed.

In terms of imaging, Jeezy could rock a suit, but you’d assume he was going to court. He’s much more at home in some high end black jeans and a white or black T shirt with some Gucci or Prada shoes. Jay Z is more likely to be recognized in a button down shirt with cuff links or an expensive Italian suit. Image is a big part of marketing. What is your image? What sentence would a fan use to describe you? Is that description unique or does it fit ten other rappers?

Now, as you promote your image to the masses to gain awareness, it’s important that your message is clear, concise, and easy to understand. A flyer with 20 things crowded on it, and no empty space for the eye to rest, is a waste. Having things mis-spelled or grammatically incorrect is terrible too. Photos that are too low resolution that they look grainy and out of focus make you look cheap and clueless. The look of your promotional materials says a lot about who you are as a person. It would be easier for Yo Gotti to get away with something grimy and street than Jay Z or Puffy. Image is everything, and yours should be consistent.

If you have no understanding of design or aesthetics, find someone who does. If you suck at writing copy, find someone who has that talent to write the words for your flyers, social media pages, website, bio, and CD booklets (liner notes). Find people who are good at what they do and hire them to help you. Know your role and play it. Don’t try to do everything yourself. Teamwork is key here.

When you choose your own lane, try not to bite what has come before you. There is already a Jay Z, already a Lil Wayne, already a Drake. Try not to copy their style or image or sound. Usually the one who does it first, does it best, so be unique.

I suggest to small labels all of the time that they use one image of the artist to have consistency in marketing. First of all, you don’t have the budget of a major label who can afford to market Rick Ross in a suit, a sweatsuit, as well as street clothes. Pick one image and use that for your CD cover, vehicle wrap, website, flyers, posters, etc. It is very rare that a fan recalls a new artist’s name. There are just too many new artists. So very often they will go into the store asking for the kid who is rapping next to a Lamborghini on his posters, or that kid who is into skateboarding, etc. Make it easy for people to figure out who you are. Use one strong image that stands out to market yourself, and sets you apart from everyone else.

When I first started working with TMI Boyz in 2008, our t-shirts were so ugly that I would never wear them. We gave out like 10,000 of those ugly shirts. Finally, we had the logo and shirts redesigned. We had everybody asking for our shirts and wearing them (including me). We even had folks offering to buy them from us (truth is t-shirts are more expensive to print, so we should sell the t-shirts and give out the CDs for free. Ha ha ha ha).

Your marketing mix should consist of whatever you can afford from the following–

Promotions:
Street promotion
Radio promotion
Club promotion
Retail store promotion
Internet promotion
Social media marketing
Publicity (blog, magazine, and media mentions)
Promotional Tour

Advertising:
Magazine ads
Billboards
Cable TV
Radio Ads
Internet Banner Ads

Tools:
Videos & Behind-the-scenes footage
Snippet CDs
Mixed CDs
T-Shirts
Wrapped Vehicles
Posters/Flyers/Post Cards

Don’t forget to incorporate the internet as part of your campaign. While we still aren’t 100% digital yet in this era, it is a crucial part of your marketing mix. To those of you with no budget who think free internet promotions is enough to build an artist, you are wrong. It is exactly what it is: inexpensive promotions, but just one part of your whole marketing pie. You still need the streets, clubs, and real world promotion.

I can’t stress enough the importance of your imaging and marketing. Make sure your messages are clear, well designed, spelled correctly and grammatically correct. And most of all, make sure you are reaching the people who will buy your music, with your imaging, your design, and your marketing mix. This should put you one step closer to success whether your plan is to stay independent or to attract legitimate deal offers from established record labels. (2/2013)

Reblogged from: BundlePost, courtesy of: Robert Caruso

A frequent question I get from my connections in the social graph is “How do I build a relationship with an influencer for my brand/product”. Though it is a common question, the answer isn’t as common.

Since I sincerely believe that social media marketing is a parallel universe to the real world, I always take a step back and consider what we do in real life. What are the steps we would take in our local offline environment to accomplish this? What adjustments can/should we make within the social sphere to help us achieve what we are wanting to do.

First, we need to understand that social media marketing is NOT about you. You have to have a mindset of giving, providing value to others and a willingness to help them succeed.

Secondly. you need to clearly define what you hope to accomplish by building the relationship with the influencer. Review your product? Have a phone call? Share your link? There are many different goals one could have for wanting to build a relationship with someone specific within social media. know what yours is.

Once you have aligned your thinking with the first and second points above, you can then follow these steps to best position yourself for a relationship:

1) Identify – Be sure that the person/brand you are targeting for the relationship makes sense. Identify the person(s) that are best suited for your brand, product or service.

2) Observe & Document – Do your research. Make sure you know what they do, their website and blog locations. Monitor their social posts and conversations and take note of who they are as a person and what drives their conversations. Pay specific attention to the human/personal topics that they engage around and document the information.

Don’t rush the observation step. Take time to understand the influencer. Rushing will usually result in missing the important subtle things that are most important! This can take a week or a month, depending on the person. Take your time…

3) Engage – Once you understand the topic drivers and personality of your influencer, begin to engage with them. Specifically comment on their posts, share their content and facilitate meaningful conversations with that person. If they have a blog, share their articles and comment on them. Look for ways you can assist them by furthering their reach, introducing them to prospects and retweet their relevant content.

*Important – A big mistake made at this stage is to do too much too quickly. Do NOT like/share bomb. (don’t like 5 posts on their wall in a row or RT their last 4 posts, etc.) This can come across as stalking or an obvious ploy. Use common sense and ramp up these activities over several weeks or months.

4) Build – Build a relationship with the influencer through more and more frequent conversations.

5) Ask/Answer – Ask open-ended questions about them, their articles and their business. The goal here is to continue to further the relationship building, but also foster a climate where the influencer begins asking YOU questions about what yo do. This is the point you know you have earned the right to talk about what you do and what you would like from them.

*Important – DO NOT ask for anything at any point before this stage. You must do the work prior to requesting a call, review of your service or sharing of your content. Also, be sure that you continue steps 3, 4 and 5 on an ongoing basis. Don’t make the influencer feel as though they had a horrible one night stand and were played.

I cannot stress enough that patience in the entire process is crucial. If you follow these techniques and take it slow, you will develop influencer relationships that will bring value to them and benefit your brand.

Robert M. Caruso
@fondalo
Founder/CEO – Bundle Post

Increasing Your YouTube Views

February 20, 2013

youtube-facts-figures-by-techwelkinGetting people to watch your videos on YouTube is a process. There is no one simple solution that’ll make your video go viral. First we have to realize that people upload 60 hours of video to YouTube EVERY MINUTE of EVERY DAY! Pause for a second….that’s an hour of video that just got uploaded to YouTube! It would take 8 years to watch the videos uploaded to YouTube just today.

 There are over 500 million channels on YouTube. The site gets 800 million visitors per month and of course is accessible worldwide. YouTube Mobile gets 600 million views everyday. 500 YEARS of YouTube videos are watched everyday on Facebook alone. 100 million people take a social action on YouTube (likes, shares, comments, etc.) every week.

 The first thing I’d like to point out about YouTube is that 70% of the traffic comes from outside the U.S.; this means that YouTube is truly a global force. Since this blog is written for the purpose of helping aspiring artists, our focus is going to be those 8 million people in the U.S. who visit YouTube every day. We’re not going to ignore the international market, but the truth is that most of you are on a limited budget and can’t afford the hundreds of thousands of dollars that a national ad campaign costs, much less the millions required for an international ad campaign. (To our readers outside the U.S. there is still pertinent info here.) Now let’s talk about the process of getting views.

 There are several ways to get your video seen by more people. Here, at A Scratchy Throat we like to keep it simple yet effective. We assume that you’ve already created a YouTube account and named your channel. Once your account is setup and you have the video ready that you want to upload, the very first thing you’re going to do BEFORE uploading is rename the VIDEO FILE itself to contain relevant keywords about the content of the video. For example, a video name would be:

“cupid shuffle dance video.mov”

While your renamed video is uploading you can add your tags. Since I’m using an R&B artist like Cupid as an example, my keywords might include:

Cupid, New Cupid, soul, Lafayette, Hub City, Louisiana, music, family friendly, dance, dancing, fun, shuffle, “cupid shuffle”, “line dance”

 Some people even tag their video with other popular rappers names or events in hopes that their video pops up when people search for “Lil Wayne” or “Miami Heat” or “Rihanna”. I don’t suggest you try this, because it doesn’t get you more views. If you’re having problems choosing, the YouTube Keyword Tool will help you figure out what keywords to add to your video.

 Next is your video description. Start your video description with a link to your website or blog (make sure that your video is embedded on the page you link to). Write up at least 2 paragraphs for the video description section that tells what the video is about. Be creative and include your keywords in the natural flow of these two or three paragraphs. YouTube uses this description when people search for videos, so the link and the description will help you to get views more than you may think.

 Once you’ve got your tags and video description done, double check to make sure that ALL the keywords that relate to your video are included in the “tags” section of your video. This helps with Search Engine Optimization for YouTube searches.

 Now that the groundwork is laid, and the video is uploaded, it’s time to start sharing your video.

 Embed the video to your site or blog. Encourage you’re your friends and fellow bloggers to visit and comment on your video. When you “embed” a video to your site it allows your fans to view the video on your site without having to go to YouTube. If you have friends with websites, ask them to embed your video as well. Make sure you do the same for them. Multiple people working towards the same goals (increased YouTube views for all) is the definition of networking.

 On Facebook, embed your video to YOUR OWN page and your fan page. Don’t bother posting it to your friends’ pages, or putting it in people’s inboxes, it annoys people more than influencing them to check out your video. It’s better to post the video to your page, tagging your CLOSEST friends in it. Post the video as a status and either to pay to have it promoted ($7) or post it several times a day for the first few days, then maybe twice a day afterwards. You CAN ask your friends to share the video to their pages. Think about it, isn’t your video more likely to be seen if 100 people share it with their friends, instead of you posting it all over their pages without their knowledge? Don’t be the ass clown who posts their video to all of their Facebook friends’ pages. These are the posts that get deleted, not watched.

 On Twitter include the link in tweets about your new video. Do NOT @people your video link. This is annoying, doesn’t increase views, and often gets you blocked. Twitter is a means of communication and interaction. Don’t be the person who just @s links and tweets about their new “hot” mixtape or “smash” single. This doesn’t draw you any extra attention or give you more views. Engage in conversation with people on twitter, and as you connect with each other introduce them to the OPTION of checking out your video. @ing a link to your video to your followers or “important” people in the music industry is SPAM. It’s a waste of time and does much more harm than good. Don’t be the douchebag spammer who gets muted or blocked!

 Lastly, no matter which social network you’re using, encourage sharing and commenting. With our example above, “The Cupid Shuffle,” you might even ask your fans to create their own response video doing “The Cupid Shuffle” and then you can tweet and share the links to THEIR version of your video as well. You could even conduct a contest and give a prize to the person with the best response video. The Harlem Shake is an example of this promotional idea that went viral.

 The possibilities and probabilities for your new video are endless. Just realize that Rome wasn’t built in a day. You’ll have to stick to your guns and not give up. Don’t get discouraged and start doing what all the other guys with 100 views are doing. Don’t become a spammer. The “easy” techniques aren’t working for THEM and they won’t work for you either.

 Everybody can’t be the next “Psy” and have a BILLION views of their video. Although, you DO have a chance to be successful!! Follow these basic tips and continue to educate yourself on how to get the most views for your video, and you’ll see your channel subscribers growing daily.

 Lastly, just in case you didn’t know, buying views doesn’t work. Knowledge, dedication, hard work and persistence do work. Do what works and maybe you’ll see us tweeting about how much we like your new video (but don’t spam us your link!! LOL).

Tony Guidry is Senior Marketing Manager for A ScratchyThroatA Scratchy Throat – the brainchild of industry mainstay Wendy Day – provides professional social media marketing specifically designed for today’s aspiring artists.

The primary focus of the blogs contained here at A Scratchy Throat  are to help you boost your social reach in today’s online market. Every day, people use social networks to help them sell their music, get shows or sell merch. You can become one of these people with the right amount of research and determination.

 Negative people always know how to fail. They say YouTube doesn’t work because you can buy views; or that Facebook doesn’t give you a proper percentage of fan interaction; or that Twitter isn’t a proper platform to market your songs. They tell you that Reverbnation and Soundcloud are like ghost-towns (nobody goes there). That MySpace is dead. Negative people say that nobody buys music anymore; and that everyone downloads their music for free.

 Negative people tell you these things because they actually believe them. It’s your job to do your research and find out for yourself if what these negative people believe is true.

 Kendrick Lamar went platinum last year, and before you say it’s because he’s signed to a major label, Macklemore & Ryan Lewis are independent artists and their single Thrift Shop just went 3x platinum.

It’s your choice to make the most out of every networking opportunity that comes your way. Don’t forget to look at your own expectations of social networks and decide HOW to approach promoting your music online.

AN ONLINE PRESENCE IS NECESSARY FOR YOUR SUCCESS IN TODAY’S MUSIC INDUSTRY.

So where do you start? What network do you use? Well, that depends on the kind of music you make and who you believe is your audience. Billions of people use social networks. Here’s a list of the more popular ones for our purposes:

Now before u choose the site with the most visitors, let’s look at the ages of the users of some of the various network sites:

Modified graphic from pingdom.com

We all know music doesn’t appeal to everyone in all age groups (although I’ve heard many of you say “everyone is my target market”). Even though there are 60 year old women who like 2 Chainz, his main target market is 18-34 men. Even though some 10 year olds may like to groove with Maze & Frankie Beverly, the band’s target audience is 35+ (they haven’t released new music since 1993). So evaluate your music and content. You don’t want to target people 45+ years old if you’re a hipster or gangster rapper; and you don’t want to target 0-17 year olds if you play traditional jazz. Choose your target audience appropriately, and use the network where you will have the biggest possible audience.

Paying close attention to the chart above, you’ll notice that Tumblr has the most 18-24 year old users. If you’re a young rapper and want to engage people from 18-34, then it looks like your target audience uses mostly Tumblr, Blogger, & MySpace. But if you’re more of an R&B type artist and want to target ages 25-44, your audience is biggest on Twitter, Blogger & WordPress. Finally, if you cater to a more mature audience, like 35+, then Facebook, WordPress & LinkedIn hold bigger parts of your target market. Now these indicators don’t mean that you should shut down or not use ALL social networks. This is just an example of the research that you have to do to locate your potential audience.

If you dedicate the time, an internet search will show you which social networks have the most women, the most college graduates, or the most high school dropouts. I think that I’ve given you enough to get you started in locating the people you want to share your music with online. Now it’s up to you to get your profiles setup and to start engaging the people who have similar interests to you. Remember, DO NOT spam your links to people’s pages!!! That doesn’t work!! Get to know ’em first– you’ve narrowed down your prospects and are talking to your target market. Make sure that your aim is steady before you fire!

Tony Guidry is Senior Marketing Manager for A Scratchy Throat. A Scratchy Throat – the brainchild of industry mainstay Wendy Day – provides professional social media marketing specifically designed for today’s aspiring artists.

“I can post my music to facebook and reach millions of people.”

While it’s true that over a billion people visit facebook every month, you must have a strategy and plan in place if you’re trying to get a portion of them to actually view your page and listen to your music. There are tried and tested methods that will boost your exposure on Facebook. Today, we’re gonna look at the more basic ways to bring attention to your page and your music so that you can get more “likes” and “listens.”

First, just posting your music to your Facebook page and hoping that people listen is not enough. Posting a link to your song or your video on your friends’ pages is NOT networking and DOESN’T work. (To be honest, when you post links to people’s pages or inbox them your link unannounced, it gets deleted – the reality is that most people aren’t going to your Soundcloud or Reverbnation link just because you post it on their page.) You have to establish a relationship with a person first in order for your networking efforts to be successful. Any unsolicited links you “give” them are considered SPAM!!! You don’t need to spam your music to gain new fans. You only need to learn how to use the social media tools Facebook makes available to you.

So I hope you understand that uploading your music on Facebook is only seen by the people you interact with–and you hope they listen to it. Your closer friends will probably like and comment on your music (they like everything you post anyway). You won’t engage many new people this way though– and what’s the point in posting your music online if you’re not going to reach new people? Of course you could just stick to street & club promotions (which can be very effective), but what’s the purpose of making music if you’re not doing what you need to do in order to MAKE SURE that new people give it a listen?

Secondly, the reason you want Facebook “likes” is because they may eventually lead to sales, and in the BUSINESS of music, money needs to be made in some way shape or form. So whether you use your likes to ask people to buy your music, attend an event, or purchase a T-shirt or whatever it might be, you’ve got to find a way to make money from your craft if you’re in the music BUSINESS. If you’re someone who makes music just for the love or as a hobby, then this post AIN’T for you.

Now, for those artists, managers, or label owners, etc, who are interested in using Facebook to get seen and heard……..let’s talk about the simplest ways to get facebook likes.

I’m sure that most of you have seen an offer to buy “likes”. The websites selling the “likes” promise hundreds or thousands (or tens of thousands) of likes for a low cost. I’ve seen it range from $30 for 1,000 to $1200 for 100,000 likes. These so-called services promise you likes in a “few days”. Which leads us to the question: do these services work? Well, they work to get you likes, just not the ones you’re looking for. The problem is that with fake likes you don’t have a genuine fan. A fake like will never listen to your music or buy your song. A fake like will never tweet or post a status about your music so a fake like is worthless in the music industry. Add to that fact that Facebook, as a company, will remove the majority of fake likes eventually, making you look worse than before! Buying fake likes won’t solve the problem of marketing your music–just like most business shortcuts, it’s non-effective and likely to do more harm than good.

So what’s the most effective way to introduce new people to your music and reach the people who are interested in what you make?? You pay for it.

Facebook Ads for business are the simplest way to reach new people on Facebook. The setup is simple. Facebook literally walks you through the steps:

Take your time and pay attention as it’s all laid out for you: from how to build and customize your page, to how to invite your friends to like and interact with you. You’ve gotta START with your friends, and build from there. Fortunately, Facebook gives you the key elements necessary to get started.

Once you have your page setup, start posting content. Invite your friends to like your new page first and do NOT just spam links of your music or videos! Have conversations with the people who like your page, engage with them, share interests and insight. Again, Facebook gives you insight on how to do this effectively:

So far, everything we’ve covered is free. You can research and learn how to build your followers and likes from here. You don’t NEED to pay for anything at this point. Once your page is created, you have to consistently post interesting statuses.

Eventually you’ll reach a point where investing into targeting other markets makes sense, and when that time comes you’ll want to start an ad campaign for your page. Don’t jump the gun here though. Be consistent in posting to your page and talking to the people who’ve liked your page.

Before you even think about buying ads to draw people, you will want to have at least 100 legitimate likes from friends, etc. Remember, you gotta have those 100 likes before you even think about taking it to the next level.

Setting up your ad is simple and, again, the folks at Facebook have everything laid out for you. At first, it may seem confusing when you’re asked if you want to:

Get More Likes
Promote Page Posts
Advanced Options

You’ll make your decision based on what you’re trying to do. (I know that you have goals, right?) So depending on your goals, you’ll choose to promote individual page posts, or to expose your page to as many people as possible, or simply to get more likes. Once you make that decision, you can move on to deciding WHO to reach.

You can choose to target a city or even a particular zip code INSIDE a city (so u can target an actual neighborhood if you want to!). You also have the choice to target people with certain interests. You can target people who like Pop music or R&B; or you can be more specific and target people who like Rihanna, Beyonce, Lil Wayne, or Drake, for example. You can target married people, single people, or people who love sports. There are numerous categories that allow you to really pinpoint the people most probable to like your page.

Below is an example of a campaign designed to target Facebook users in Jacksonville, FL (including 25 miles outside the city):

If you noticed, the target audience is aged 13-40, with an interest in Music– specifically Hip Hop/Rap and R&B/Soul music. Our choices have narrowed down potential fans in the Jacksonville area from over 457,000 people to almost 172,000. This isn’t a bad thing because it targets people who list music as an interest and these people are more likely to become a fan.

So what will it cost?? Well, that’s totally up to you. The good people at Facebook allow you to choose exactly how long you want to run your ad, how much you’re willing to pay for people to see your ad, and how much money you’re willing to spend per day on your ad campaign.

As you maneuver through the options available, you’ll be able to cater to the appropriate audience for you. It’s not hard to get your Facebook ads started. It will take some tweaking and tinkering to get the best results but with the right effort, focus and determination you can build an ad campaign that converts clicks to your page into likes and likes into fans who you can THEN reach out to and ask to listen to your music or watch your latest video.

At the end of the day, your Facebook page and any ad campaign associated with it is only a small part of the total work you’ll need to do in order to succeed. Internet presence is becoming more and more important in today’s digital age.

Tony Guidry is Senior Marketing Manager for A Scratchy ThroatA Scratchy Throat – the brainchild of industry mainstay Wendy Day – provides professional social media marketing specifically designed for today’s aspiring artists.

 

By, Chris Mexton Reposted from KissMetrics

You’d be pretty hard pressed to argue that PSY’s Gangnam Stylehasn’t been a runaway marketing success. With over 1 BILLIONviews on YouTube, Gangnam Style has firmly planted itself in our collective psyche.

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Love it or hate it, I think we all can agree that we want that sort of marketing success for our businesses. One of the things that makes the best online marketers successful is their ability to creatively draw on marketing tactics and resources from many domains, not just the world of online business. The question you should ask yourself as an online marketer is: “Is there anything we can learn from the success of Gangnam Style?”

As it happens, K-pop (an abbreviation of Korean pop), which is South Korea’s pop music industry, is pretty darn savvy when it comes to marketing, and there is a lot that goes into forming a K-pop supergroup. PSY’s success is doubly interesting as he is not your typical K-pop artist.

After reading a ton about the world of K-pop, there are a number of ideas we can glean from it.

Here are three things I’ll bet you don’t know about the K-pop industry and what you can do with this knowledge to build your own email marketing machine.

1. Measure Absolutely Everything

The Verge recently did a massive feature on K-pop. One of the most interesting aspects of the article about it is the discussion ofCulture Technology. Culture Technology refers to the way in which South Korea’s largest record labels attempt to design K-pop bands.

In their eyes, a K-pop group is not just a band but a brand. When auditioning for a new band, the top record labels run software simulations on potential group members to see how their voice and appearance will change in the next 3-7 years. They narrow down the applicants to a group they feel will be successful, and then they teach the group members to sing, dance, and even speak foreign languages.

In many cases, bands consist of 10+ members, allowing the labels to optimize and split roles, particularly when the band performs overseas, for example.

Why do they do this? To maximize their chance for growth and long term success. There’s no business like show business, and K-pop clearly knows how to run the show!

What is most interesting about this is that it nicely correlates with running a successful online business. The key lesson here is to measure everything.

When it comes to our email marketing campaigns, there is a lot we can do to ensure we get accurate, actionable data.

In my experience, the best people in the email marketing biz ask themselves: “Are these emails driving the actions I want? Are they increasing my customer lifetime value?”

Not only should we pay attention to deliverability, opens and clicks, but also follow through, which customers actually convert, and which, ultimately, turn out to be the most profitable.

Only with this sort of granularity can you understand whichcustomer cohorts are best to go after, where you can improve your email marketing content, and where you should invest your marketing budget.

A popular email remarketing tactic is to collect customers’ email addresses and send out a series of educational emails in order to build trust prior to making a sale. An extremely effective tactic, it does mean that, for most SaaS businesses, you will end up sending your customers somewhere between 5-18 emails from the time they start receiving your educational email campaign to the time they become a paying customer. (Email remarketing involves sending emails to customers based on what they do or don’t do on your website.)

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That’s quite a lot of email, meaning you have a lot of room to optimize. Are customers engaging with your educational content? Are your open rates increasing? Could you get more action from your potential customers with a different call to action or a “Big Orange Button”? Do customers coming from this channel stick around longer than customers you acquire from other channels?

These are the questions you want to be answering if you plan to dominate your email marketing.

One of the most effective ways to know what on earth is going on is to tag your outgoing campaign links with as much detail as possible.

Both Google Analytics and products like KISSmetrics allow you to use URL parameters quickly and easily to see specifically what a customer is doing.

Here’s a screenshot from one of KISSmetrics’ epic infographicson customer lifecycle tracking:

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For Google Analytics, you can do the same using UTM codes. Then, at a glance, you can see which campaign or variation is converting most effectively. And, with a little tweaking, you can drill down deeper and see sub-cohorts. (Did the user originally come via a Google search, Twitter, or some other channel?)

Using KISSmetrics’ revenue tracking, you can go even further and understand exactly how your emails impact a customer’s journey from initial visit to purchase. With that information, you will be able to determine if a campaign is actively working to increase your customer lifetime value over the long term.

Key takeaway: If you don’t have this sort of granularity over your email marketing campaigns, set it up! It’s not too hard to do if youfollow this great guide.

2. Test the Unexpected

In the world of highly-tuned K-pop bands, no one ever would have expected that Vivienne Westwood-wearing, horse-dancing PSY’s Gangnam Style would become the phenomenon that it has.

In fact, I’m not sure anyone anywhere would have expected it!

Here are just a few unexpected things about PSY and Gangnam Style that initially made the song’s success in either South Korea or the rest of the world unlikely:

  • He was educated in the US (he went to Berkley School of Music), and he wasn’t part of the highly-measured K-pop process outlined above.
  • PSY’s sense of style is unique and certainly different from most mainstream artists, in any genre.
  • Gangnam Style was released on YouTube without any copyright restrictions.
  • The video is, in many ways, completely bizarre.
  • The song is in Korean!

However, with a bit of reflection, we can see that all of those things have contributed to the genius and addictive nature of the song.

The point here is that, often, the unexpected works best.

One of the masters of this domain is content marketer, Matthew Inman of The Oatmeal. Take this title from a sign-up form on his blog:

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Now that’s how you put the unexpected to work. The first thought that runs through your head is “Ugh, what?” That is quickly followed by an almost uncontrollable urge to take action and find out more. Who wouldn’t click-through on that form?

Embracing creativity when it comes to any form of online marketing is essential. For every 10 crazy A/B tests you do, it’s likely that only one will give you significant gains. But, oh boy, will they be worth it.

Take the team at Strikingly.com. They’ve got a referral system they use to encourage engagement and source new customers. Having proved that the concept worked well for their target market, they began testing different concepts.

Want to see the change that increased referrals by 100%?

gangnam5

 

That’s right, a dancing cat nailed it! If they weren’t experimenting with all sorts of ideas, they wouldn’t have found this winner.

When it comes to email marketing campaigns, the best examples of “quirky” content have, in fact, virtually become legend.

Take this classic example from Zappos below. Their post-purchase campaign informing customers that their order has been automatically upgraded to expedited shipping is a beautiful example of creativity at work.

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Not only is the concept sound, but the copy and delivery here give the email a real kick. This email was frequently blogged about and mentioned online. It takes only a quick Google search to find plenty of customers praising Zappos’ awesome customer service.

A good approach for coming up with winning campaign content is to try and change the way you tackle an extremely common campaign – something that is usually boring and completely run-of-the-mill.

Another, even more famous, example comes from Derek Sivers. Take a read:

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Derek could have simply written: “Your order status has been updated and your order has been shipped,” but instead he wrote this!

As Derek mentioned in his book, Anything You Want, googling “private CD Baby jet” will return many thousands of results (900,000 for me), which is evidence of the impact of his spur-of-the-moment creativity.

If this example doesn’t provide the business case for A/B testing your transactional emails, then nothing will.

Key takeaway: Get creative, test the unexpected, and create some buzz!

3. Find Your Company’s Voice and Be Yourself

From the streets of Seoul to The Ellen DeGeneres Show, PSY iseverywhere.

Partly thanks to the unconventional nature of PSY’s wardrobe and dance, they have helped him shape his brand and have been a huge part of the continued success of his marketing juggernaut.

Once you’ve begun testing and started to find what works for your business, you need to stick with it and give your email campaigns a unique voice – you need to rock your own attitude.

The Zappos example above contributes perfectly to their reputation for insanely awesome customer service. This is something they’ve built up through consistent communication with their customers and by constantly impressing people with their attitude.

Remember: great marketing is about connecting with customers. You need to be personable and consistent and build trust over time.

Dropbox injects this sort of personality into all of their customer communication. This particular example is sent to customers who sign up but then do not set up Dropbox within a few days. Like their website, the product itself, and their updates, this campaign is clean and lighthearted. It not only drives the correct action from their customers (install Dropbox!) but contributes to customers’ perception of Dropbox as a business.

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Another example of consistency of attitude is AppSumo. Much loved by their customers, Noah Kagan and the team have done an awesome job of building a loyal fan base. A huge part of this is off the back of the way they communicate on their website, in their emails, and even in overlooked places…like this awesome unsubscribe page.

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A third and final example comes from Atlassian. This landing page is quirky, creative, and a great reflection of the company’s attitude and culture. This isn’t your standard WordPress “give me your email address” landing page. Atlassian is well known for their awesome customer service and sense of humor, and their marketing team tries to reflect that in everything they do.

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Key takeaway: Where can you re-write your landing pages and email copy to reflect your company culture and infuse some attitude?

It Ain’t All Dancing!

Online marketing is about connecting with your customers and measuring everything you can about your marketing efforts.

When it comes to email marketing, you must ensure you’re tracking all of your core email metrics and the true impact these emails are having on your conversion and revenue metrics.

Use your email marketing tools in conjunction with Google Analytics and KISSmetrics, and you’ll be able to build a framework that lets you experiment with sharing your voice and fresh creative marketing ideas in order to uncover huge improvements in your conversion rates!

What crazy / unique / challenging email marketing ideas have you used or seen? How do you use email marketing and analytics tools to ensure your numbers are spot on?

About the Author: Chris Hexton is a co-founder of email remarketing software Vero. He spends his days helping online businesses optimize their email marketing and use it effectively to maximize their profit. You can catch him on Twitter via @chextonand @veroapp. He’d love to talk with you!

12 Rules to Choose the Right Domain Name

Posted by  to Technical SEO Issues, reposted from: http://www.seomoz.org/blog/how-to-choose-the-right-domain-name

A long time ago, I wrote a post on domain name selection that’s sorely in need of an update. Time to deliver…

For 99% of the projects we take on, a domain is already part of the equation. However, in some circumstances, we’ve been called on to provice advice for naming a domain, either for a new blog, a company launch or even just a friend’s website. Below, I’ve listed 12 tips I find indispensable when helping people select a great domain name.

Brainstorm 5 Top Keywords
When you first begin your domain name search, it helps to have 5 terms or phrases in mind that best describe the domain you’re seeking. Once you have this list, you can start to pair them or add prefixes & suffixes to create good domain ideas. For example, if you’re launching a mortgage related domain, you might start with words like “mortage, finance, home equity, interest rate, house payment” then play around until you can find a good match.

 
Make the Domain Unique
Having your website confused with a popular site already owned by someone else is a recipe for disaster. Thus, I never choose domains that are simply the plural, hyphenated or misspelled version of an already established domain. I still believe that Flickr desperately needs to buy Flicker.com – I hear kids in their 20’s tell parents in their 40’s and 50’s to see photos on Flickr and always envision that traffic going straight to the wrong domain.

 
Only Choose Dot-Com Available Domains
If you’re not concerned with type-in traffic, branding or name recognition, you don’t need to worry about this one. However, if you’re at all serious about building a successful website over the long-term, you should be worried about all of these elements, and while directing traffic to a .net or .org (as SEOmoz does) is fine, owning and 301’ing the .com is critical. With the exception of the very tech-savvy, most people who use the web still make the automatic assumption that .com is all that’s out there – don’t make the mistake of locking out or losing traffic to these folks.

 
Make it Easy to Type
If a domain name requires considerable attention to type correctly, due to spelling, length or the use of un-memorable words or sounds, you’ve lost a good portion of your branding and marketing value. I’ve even heard usability folks toute the value of having the letters include easy-to-type letters (which I interpret as avoiding “q,” “z,” “x,” “c,” and “p”).

 
Make it Easy to Remember
Remember that word-of-mouth and SERPs dominance marketing (where your domain consistently comes up for industry-related searches) both rely on the ease with which the domain can be called to mind. You don’t want to be the company with the terrific website that no one can ever remember to tell their friends about because they can’t remember the domain name.

 
Keep the Name as Short as Possible
Short names are easy to type and easy to remember (the previous two rules). They also allow for more characters in the URL in the SERPs and a better fit on business cards and other offline media.

 
Create and Fulfill Expectations
When someone hears about your domain name for the first time, they should be able to instantly and accurately guess at the type of content that might be found there. That’s why I love domain names like Hotmail.com, CareerBuilder.com, AutoTrader.com and WebMD.com. Domains like Monster.com, Amazon.com and Zillow.com (whom I usually praise) required far more branding because of their un-intuitive names.

 
Avoid Copyright Infringement
This is a mistake that isn’t made too often, but can kill a great domain and a great company when it does. To be sure you’re not infringing on anyone’s copyright with your site’s name, visit copyright.gov and search before you buy.

 
Set Yourself Apart with a Brand
Using a unique moniker is a great way to build additional value with your domain name. A “brand” is more than just a combination of words, which is why names like mortgageforyourhome.com or…

What are Facebook Ads? These Glossary of Terms will get you Started

Whether you are a business owner or a social media professional who is familiar with the power of Facebook, chances are you have probably asked, “What are Facebook Ads?” You already may have been introduced to Facebook Ads through your social media training; they’re those ads that appear on the right-hand column of almost any page within Facebook, from your home page and news feed, to your profile and apps pages.

Facebook Ads attract fans of all demographics, reaching out to hundreds of millions of Facebook users. With Facebook Ads, you can raise awareness of your product or service to people who otherwise may not have known about it, and you can create ads to promote events as well as products or services.

When asking, “What are Facebook Ads?” it’s important to understand and become familiar with the terminology used with regard to the ads. This glossary of terms provides a solid introduction and a better understanding of Facebook Ads:

Ads Manager. This is where you can view all of your Facebook ad campaigns, revise bids and budgets, pause and restart ads at any time. The Ads Manager is your main hub for Facebook Ads.

Ads. When creating an ad, you are attempting to reach different target audiences by highlighting your products or services in an interesting manner. Use an interesting photo or a company logo, and then complete the ad by writing a concise description that cannot be ignored by those in your desired demographics. Each ad has a daily or lifetime budget.

Campaigns. Group your ads into “campaigns” based on whatever criteria you deem necessary. For instance, you may want to create a campaign from all of your ads geared to a specific demographic.

Ad Auction. This is the system that Facebook uses to decide which ads are best to run. They base this on the ads’ maximum bid and previous ad performance. The ads that Facebook decides are the best to show will be the ones most prominently featured.

Budget. The budget is the amount of money you are willing to spend on a campaign either each day or for the life of the ad. These two kinds of budgets are known as daily or lifetime budgets.

Bid. When you place a bid on the ad you’re creating, you’re indicating the maximum amount you are willing to pay per click (also known as CPC) or per thousand impressions of your Facebook Ads (CPM). The maximum bid determines your ad’s strength in the ad auction, giving it better chances of being displayed.

Suggested Bid Range. This represents the range of CPC or CPM bids that are winning the auction for the audience you’ve selected.
Clicks. When someone clicks through your ad to your website or a specific landing page on Facebook, you’re charged for the ad. Clicks are also counted when someone “Likes” your ad or RSVP’s to an event through your ad.

Impressions. Impressions are counted when your ad is shown on any part of the Facebook site, regardless of whether someone clicks on your ad.

Social impressions. Social impressions happen when an ad is viewed by a Facebook user who is friend of someone who has interacted with the ad.

CTR. CTR stands for “Click-Through Rate,” the number of clicks your ad receives divided by the number of times your ad is shown on the site during that time period. The CTR gives you an idea of how effective your ad is on Facebook.

Connections metric. This metric includes people who have “Liked” your page, RSVP’d to your events or installed one of your apps from seeing your ad on Facebook.

Reports. The reports give you all of the analytics information you need regarding your ads and campaigns. You can create and print out ad reports based on the parameters you wish to know more about, and you can export into an Excel or a .csv file.

Sponsored Stories. These are stories that are eligible to appear both in users’ news feeds and in the right-hand column with other Facebook Ads. Sponsored Stories respect whatever privacy settings a user has placed on their account, so if their activity is hidden it will not be used for Sponsored Stories.

Page Post Ads. This is one of the newest innovations for Facebook Ads. With Page Post Ads, you turn a post made to your page—a status update, picture, link or video, etc.—into an ad for your page. These are not subject to privacy settings and can be shown to anyone on Facebook.